52 WEEKS – WHAKAMANATIA TE REO

1. Pōwhiri

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Kaupapa

Our first kaupapa is the reo and tikanga of pōwhiri. For many of you, your first interaction at a new school, will be as manuhiri being welcomed at a pōwhiri. It is important that you know what to expect and are prepared. In turn, once you have become part of a school, you will participate in welcoming guests with pōwhiri.

Kōrero: What experiences of pōwhiri have you had already?

Panui: Read through each page from Te Ara – Te kawa o te marae. It will give you a good understanding of marae etiquette (and variations in this etiquette).

Titiro: The short video clips demonstrating the pōwhiri process on this University of Otago site will familiarise you with what to expect – even when the process is adapted to a school setting.

Whakarongo: Spend some time listening to the kōrero of these Rauawaawa Kaumatua regarding the depth of meaning in the tikanga of Pōwhiri.

For your Kete

Waiata:

Te aroha
Te whakapono
Me te rangimārie
Tātou, tātou e

This waiata is often sung at school pōwhiri. It draws on I Corinthians 13:13
Whakarongo: Listen to it here.

Karakia:

E te Atua
Homai ki a mātou
Tōu māramatanga
Tōu rangimārie
Tōu kaha me tōu aroha
Mō tēnei rā
Āmine

This karakia is a blessing. It can be used to begin or conclude time together.
What words do you recognise?
Mahia: Spend some time learning this karakia so you can use it.

Whakataukī:

This whakataukī is foundational in our programme:

Poipoia te kākano kia puāwai.
Nurture the seed and it will blossom.

Patai: How does it support your study to become a teacher? How might you use it with your own students?

Kupu Hou

Tuhia: Create images that reminds you of the meaning of each of these kupu hou relating to pōwhiri:

Marae
Wero
Karanga
Haka Powhiri
Manuhiri
Tangata whenua
Whaikōrero
Waiata tautoko
Hongi
Hakari
Kaumātua
Koha

Poropororaki

Wetereo

Respecting and honouring people is foundational in pōwhiri.

To do this, we must be able to identify people accurately. Personal pronouns are an important part of this. There are finer distinctions in personal pronouns in te reo than in English. 

Figure 1 (which can be found here online) identifies the speaker in green and the listener in blue. The people being referred to by the pronoun are circled.

Figure 1 – Personal Pronouns in te reo

Mahia: Find 5 people and practice using the correct pronouns.

Look at this resource page – where and how can you see the different pronouns being used?

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