52 WEEKS – WHAKAMANATIA TE REO

13. Manaaki

Back to 52 Weeks

Kaupapa

This week’s kaupapa is manaakitanga. This is a foundational value in te ao Māori. Often translated as ‘hospitality, a deeper understanding of the word ‘manaaki’ can be gained by understanding its constituent parts.

  • Mana – the prestige, status, honour and spiritual power essential to a person.
  • Aki – a literal word for supporting, motivating or taking care of someone.

Interestingly, when manaakitanga is exercised, the mana of both host and recipient is enhanced. If we think about manaaki in these deeper ways, then there are many applications within schools, classrooms and our practice as teachers. 

Patai:How have you seen manaakitanga in practice in school? How can normalising te reo in your classroom support manaakitanga? 

For your Kete

This week we are reviewing the waiata, karakia and whakatauki that we learnt in “3. Pronunciation”.

Waiata:
Ehara i te mea
Nō ināianei te aroha                        
Nō nga tūpuna
Tuku iho, tuku iho

Te whenua, te whenua
Te oranga o te iwi
Nō nga tūpuna
Tuku iho, tuku iho

Whakapono, tumanako
Te aroha te aroha;
Nō nga tūpuna
Tuku iho, tuku iho

This is another common waiata.
Spend some time learning it so that you can participate when it is sung.
Whakarongo: Listen to it here  
There is a translation into English in the comments thread on YouTube.

 

Karakia:
Kia tau
Kia tātou katoa 
Te atawhai o to tātou Ariki a Ihu Karaiti
Me te aroha o te Atua
Me te whiwhingatahitanga
Ki te Wairua Tapu
Ake, ake, ake
Amene

This is a karakia mutunga. You can use it to conclude time together.
It draws from 2 Corinthians 13:14
What words do you recognise? How have pronouns been used?
Mahia: Spend some time learning this karakia so you can use it.

 

Whakatauki:
This week we will learn another whakataukī that is foundational in our programme:
Iti noa ana, he pito mata.
With care, a small kūmara will produce a harvest
Whakaaroarohia: This whakataukī reiterates an important aspect of manaakitanga. When we demonstrate manakitanga in our classrooms, our students flourish. In what ways do we demonstrate manaakitanga as teachers?

Kupu Hou

A fascinating finding that emerged from the research done by Russell Bishop and Mere Berryman was how much students valued prepared and organised teachers, spaces and resources. Being prepared and organised, is one way that we demonstrate manaakitanga in our classrooms. The kupu hou and wetereo here can help you get organised in your classroom.

When answering the ‘Where?’ question ‘Kei (w)hea?’ replace the question word ‘whea’ with a locative noun. This is revision from “7.  Instructions”.

rungaon / above
rarobelow / underneath
roto – in
wahoout
mua – in front
muribehind

Mahia: Draw and label a diagram demonstrating these kupu hou. 

Wetereo

In “12. Pepeha” we learnt the structure – ‘Kei … tōku kainga’  to locate our home. 

This week we will expand this to ask and answer where something is.

Tuhia: Use this structure and the kupu hou to write sentences that will help you to organise your classroom.

Finding this helpful?

Get quality teacher resources just like this straight to your Inbox

Sign up today to receive our regular monthly newsletters, packed with carefully curated resources that support the teacher mentoring process. Get what you need without the waffle and join a mentoring community across Aotearoa New Zealand.

Name(Required)
We value your privacy. By signing up, you agree to receive our newsletters and updates. Rest assured, we will never share or sell your information. You can unsubscribe at any time. More Information.
Be a part of the Pātaka Community
Name(Required)
We value your privacy. By signing up, you agree to receive our newsletters and updates. Rest assured, we will never share or sell your information. You can unsubscribe at any time. More Information.