52 WEEKS – WHAKAMANATIA TE REO

14. Whānau

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Kaupapa

This week’s kaupapa is whānau. We have spent time looking at pepeha and understanding the importance in te ao Māori, of locating and connecting oneself. It is equally important to be able to create familial connections.

We will use the nominal sentence structure ‘Ko …’ to talk about our families.

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In education we often talk about tuakana / teina, to describe the learning relationship between more and less experienced learners. Did you realise that this is a familial term?

What characterises tuakana / teina relationships?
What makes this such a useful way of thinking about learning relationships?

For your Kete

Waiata & Karakia:
This week the waiata we will learn uses the words of the traditional karakia, set to music – double dipping!

Whakataka te hau ki te uru
Whakataka te hau ki te tonga
Kia mākinakina ki uta
Kia mātaratara ki tai
E hī ake ana te atakura
He tio, he huka, he hau hū
Tīhei mauri ora!

This traditional karakia and waiata is often used to settle a gathering and focus on the kaupapa ahead.
Spend some time learning it so that you can participate when it is recited and sung.
Whakarongo:Listen to it here. and with an extended explanation here.

Whakataukī:
This whakataukī is a good one to help set the culture of your classroom:
He aroha whakatō, He aroha puta mai.
If kindness is sown, then kindness you shall receive.

Whakaaroarohia: Sometimes this whakataukī is put even more pithily: 
Aroha atu. Aroha mai. Meaning, Love given, love received. 
Consider how you might use this whakataukī to develop a positive culture in your classroom.

Kupu Hou

Mahia: Use this list to draw and label your own family tree.

iwi                                                                             tribe

whaea                                                                       mother, aunt

matua / mātua                                                           father, parent / parents

tama                                                                           son

tamāhine                                                                    daughter

tuahine                                                                       sister of a boy

tungāne                                                                      brother of a girl

tuakana                                                                      elder sibling (of the same sex)

teina                                                                           younger sibling (of the same sex)

pōtiki                                                                          youngest

mātāmua                                                                   eldest sibling

irāmutu                                                                      niece, nephew

tipuna/tupuna/                                                        ancestor / grandparent

tīpuna/tūpuna                                                         ancestors/grandparents

kaumātua                                                                 elder

koroua (koro)                                                           elderly man

kuia                                                                           elderly woman

hoa                                                                            friend

matua whakaangi                                                   stepfather

whaea whakaangi                                                  stepmother

wahine / wāhine                                                     woman, wife / women

tāne                                                                          man / husband

mokopuna                                                                grandchild

taokete                                                                     brother- / sister-in-law (of same gender)

hungarei                                                                   mother- / father-in-law

ingoa                                                                         name

Patai: Do you have tuakana and/or teina, tuahine or tungāne?

Wetereo

This week’s wetereo section uses the same nominal sentence structure that we used in our pepeha, ‘Ko …’, to talk about members of our family.

This question is answered by replacing the question word with your answer and changing the tōu/tāu (your) to tōku/tāku (my). 

The ā/ō categories are explained again here.

Tuhia: Write some sentences about your family and tree.
Kōrero: Work with a partner to ask and answer questions about each other’s families.

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