52 WEEKS – WHAKAMANATIA TE REO

19. Active Sentences / Kei Te …

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Kaupapa

In this lesson we will continue to use our subject specific reo to revise and extend our use of active verbal sentences.

For your Kete

Waiata & Karakia

Spend time revising the Lord’s Prayer we learnt in “9. Subject Reo”.

The Lord’s Prayer
E tō mātou Matua i te rangi
Kia tapu tou Ingoa
Kia tae mai tou rangatira-tanga.
Kia meatia tau e pai ai
ki runga i te whenua,
kia rite ano ki to te rangi.
Homai ki a mātou aianei
he taro mā mātou mo tēnei ra.
Murua o mātou hara
Me mātou hoki e muru nei
i o te hunga e hara ana ki a mātou.
Aua hoki mātou e kawea kia whaka-waia;
Engari whaka-orangia mātou, i te kino:
Nou hoki te rangatira-tanga,
te kaha,
me te kororia,
Ake, ake, ake.
Āmine.

The Lord’s Prayer is often used as both a karakia and as a waiata.

Spend some time reading through the words – which words do you already recognise, which phrases align with what you know of the Lord’s Prayer?

Here is a recording of it being sung, for you to practise along with.

Whakataukī
Revise this whakataukī that is foundational in our programme:

Mā te whiritahi, ka whakatutuki ai ngā pūmanawa ā tāngata.
Together weaving the realisation of potential.

Kupu Hou

Tuhia: Continue to use the kupu hou lists in the back of each wahanga in Te Marautanga to create your own kupu hou list.

This is the homepage for Te Marautanga on the TKI website. You will find the links here to PDF versions of this curriculum document and its translation into te reo Pākehā.

You might also want to list some more straightforward vocabulary using Te Aka online dictionary.

Wetereo

We have already discussed some of the different verb forms in te reo. Verbs in te reo may be active (transitive or intransitive), passive or stative. We will focus on writing active verbal sentences. These sentences enable you to say what you are doing, or will do in a class.

Panui: Be a grammar geek – this page gives a clear step-by-step explanation of the different types of verbs and how they are used. This Stuff article, also gives a clear explanation of the difference between an active and a passive sentence.

The structure of an active sentence:

All of the sentences above describe all of us (including the speaker and listener) going to assembly – as follows:

Kōrero: We will discuss this more in class and practise constructing sentences for your classroom. Come prepared with the vocabulary you will need to create sentences for your curriculum area.

Wero: Use the sentences you create in your classroom.

Here are some examples of ‘Kei te …’ sentences students created in class, to get you started:

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