52 WEEKS – WHAKAMANATIA TE REO

4. Greetings

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Kaupapa

This week’s kaupapa is greetings. 

Wero: Last week I challenged you to create some new TV and radio habits. This week my challenge is to create a new habit in your greetings. Set yourself the goal of greeting each person you speak with in te reo.

Panui: Spend some time learning the greetings outlined on this course resource. Use the Wetereo section below to check that you understand the pronouns that are used in the greetings. 

Kōrero: Use the slides on the course resource to practice the greetings and phrases with a friend. 

For your Kete

Waiata & Karakia:
This week the waiata we will learn uses the words of the traditional karakia, set to music – double dipping!

Whakataka te hau ki te uru
Whakataka te hau ki te tonga
Kia mākinakina ki uta
Kia mātaratara ki tai
E hī ake ana te atakura
He tio, he huka, he hau hū
Tīhei mauri ora!

This traditional karakia and waiata is often used to settle a gathering and focus on the kaupapa ahead.
Spend some time learning it so that you can participate when it is recited and sung.
Whakarongo:Listen to it here. and with an extended explanation here.

Whakataukī:
This whakataukī is a good one to help set the culture of your classroom:
He aroha whakatō, He aroha puta mai.
If kindness is sown, then kindness you shall receive.

Whakaaroarohia: Sometimes this whakataukī is put even more pithily: 
Aroha atu. Aroha mai. Meaning, Love given, love received. 
Consider how you might use this whakataukī to develop a positive culture in your classroom.

Kupu Hou

Tuhituhi: Create your kupu hou list using the greetings on the course resources. Look at them carefully – What does mārie translate as? What about ahiahi and ata. What other words can you add?

Wetereo

This week’s wetereo section reviews the personal pronouns we learnt in Week 1. It is important to use the correct pronoun when greeting groups of people:

There are finer distinctions in personal pronouns in te reo than in English. 

Figure 1 (which can be found here online) identifies the speaker in green and the listener in blue. The people being referred to by the pronoun are circled.


Figure 1 – Personal Pronouns in te reo.

Mahia: Find 5 people and practice using the correct pronouns.
Look at the greetings you have learnt. Try using them with different pronouns – how will it change when and how you could use them?

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