52 WEEKS – WHAKAMANATIA TE REO

5. Review & Date

Back to 52 Weeks

Kaupapa

This week we are consolidating what we have learnt and learning about dates. Spend some time with the activities below to review and consolidate your understanding.

Patai:  How are you going with the challenges we set ourselves?

  • Finding ways to listen to or watch some reo each day?
  • Greeting people you speak to in te reo?

For your Kete

Tuhituhia: Review the four waiata and four karakia that we have learnt. Spend some time creating visually engaging posters for your classroom walls so that
everyone in your class can participate when these are used in your class.

Whakaaroarohia: Review the four whakataukī that we have learnt so far.
Make sure you understand each one and consider a classroom activity or curriculum content that you would create links with.

Poipoia te kākano kia puāwai.
Nurture the seed and it will blossom.

Ina kei te mohio koe ko wai koe, i anga mai koe i hea, kei te mohio koe, kei te anga koe ki hea.
If you know who you are and where you are from, then you will know where you are going.

Iti noa ana, he pito mata.
With care, a small kūmara will produce a harvest.

He aroha whakatō, He aroha puta mai.
If kindness is sown, then kindness you shall receive.

Kupu Hou

Whakaaroarohia: Review the kupu hou lists that you have created. Create a mindmap that groups the words according to their meanings and the context in which they are used. What connections can you make between words? What patterns can you see? Test yourself.

Learn the language you need to present the date in te reo each day.
This site is a great resource for numbers and ordinals.

Days of the week:
Monday Rāhina
Tuesday Rātū
Wednesday Rāapa
Thursday Rāpare
Friday Rāmere
Saturday Rāhoroi
Sunday Rātapu

Months of the year:

Either version is acceptable to use. Traditional text and native speakers tended to use the kupu arotau or loan words more. Modern Māori learning environments tended to favour Ngā Marama o te Tau, although this is changing again. Sometimes you might also hear people simply numbering the months, for example, te marama tuawaru. (Adapted from Māori Language Net)

Some more useful words relating to dates:
Inaianei now
Inanahi Yesterday
Āpōpō Tomorrow

Wetereo

The date can be presented in the following format:

Rāmere 30 o Whiringa-ā-nuku

Kōrero:With your classmates, practice asking and answering:
He aha tōu rā whānau? (What is your birthday?)
Make sure you can answer, using Māori numbers.

Whakaaroarohia: Review the grammar points that you have covered over the last four weeks.

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