52 WEEKS – WHAKAMANATIA TE REO

6. Whakamanawa / Encouragement

Back to 52 Weeks

Kaupapa

Our next collection of lessons is focused on language for the classroom, including giving instructions and subject specific language.
We will begin with learning to encourage our students in te reo.
Rangahau:
What can you find out about the whakapapa of the word ‘whakamanawa’? What does its etymology tell us about its meaning?

For your Kete

Rangahau:
Does your kura have school waiata and/or a school song? Have you learnt them?
In preparation for class this week, create a resource to share with a small group. It should include as many of the following as you can:

    • – The words for the waiata and karakia.
      – The values and ideas behind the waiata and karakia (This could be a translation.)
    • – A link to a recording of each – this could be of other people or of you!

Kōrero / Whakarongo:
In class we will work in small groups to share what what we have learnt.

Whakatauki:
This whakataukī is great for encouraging students.
Ka mahi te tawa uho ki te riri
Well done, you whose courage is like the heart of the tawa tree.

Kupu Hou

Tuhia:
Choose the 10 phrases below that you think will be most useful in your
classroom. (If you know others you like, add them in!)
Create some posters that you can use to decorate your classroom walls and that will remind you to use these phrases
Ka pai!  –  Well done!
Tino pai!  –  Great stuff!
Tino pai rawa atu!  –  Excellent!

Tau ke!  –  Awesome
Tumeke!  –  Awesome! / Too much!
Mīharo!  –  Wonderful!
Te ātaahua hoki  –  That’s beautiful
Ka mau te wehi  –  That’s amazing
Kei runga noa atu koe!  –  You’re the best!

Kia mau!  –  Hang in there!
Kia kaha!  –  Be strong!
Kia manawanui!  –  Be steadfast! / Persist / Hang in there!
Ka taea e koe!  –  You can do it!

Homai te pakipaki!  –  Applaud!

Wetereo

Notice the phrases that begin with the particle “Kia”.
Te Aka tells us that “Kia” means “Be” and “indicates that it is desirable for something to occur [and is] used this way in giving commands involving adjectives (statives) and experience verbs.”

“Kia” can be used in other commands as well as encouragement, for example, “Kia tūpato” and “Be careful”.

Patai:
What other commands can you create using ‘Kia’? Practise saying them with a partner.

Mahia:
Remember our work on pronouns?
Look at the phrase: “Ka taea e koe!” meaning “You can do it!”
Which kupu in this sentence is translated as you?
How many people would you say this to?
How can you change this sentence to encourage students working in pairs?
How can you change this sentence to encourage a group of students?

Wero:
Use these encouragements in your classroom!

Finding this helpful?

Get quality teacher resources just like this straight to your Inbox

Sign up today to receive our regular monthly newsletters, packed with carefully curated resources that support the teacher mentoring process. Get what you need without the waffle and join a mentoring community across Aotearoa New Zealand.

Name(Required)
We value your privacy. By signing up, you agree to receive our newsletters and updates. Rest assured, we will never share or sell your information. You can unsubscribe at any time. More Information.
Be a part of the Pātaka Community
Name(Required)
We value your privacy. By signing up, you agree to receive our newsletters and updates. Rest assured, we will never share or sell your information. You can unsubscribe at any time. More Information.